Moving Image Archive News -

Moving Image Archive News -

About

Photo by Michele Geary
Rachel Price

Rachel Price is the founder of Moving Image Archive News. She completed an M.A. in Moving Image Archive Studies from UCLA in 2009. Prior to entering the program, she was the project lead for an access and digitization project of the film collection at the Seattle Municipal Archives, where she had previously volunteered. She was a DJ at community radio and Pacifica affiliate KBCS-FM for 14 years, while occasionally holding down the fort during breaks in management (as Program Director and Operations Manager). Her first on-air position there was a midnight-3am film soundtrack show, which she created. She is currently producing a series of animated shorts about seabirds with Seattle animator Karen Lewis. One of them, Birdathlon, has been at several film festivals in the US, Canada and the UK.

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Peter Monaghan

Peter Monaghan, the editor of Moving Image Archive News, writes about the arts, scholarly research, and other topics. He was also the librettist for the “jazz opera,” Space in the Heart by composer Bill (William O.) Smith, which was produced at Seattle’s 2008 Earshot Jazz Festival; it is being produced at Symphony Space in New York on November 5 and 6, 2010. He has written for The Chronicle of Higher Education for more than 25 years about topics in the arts and humanities, the arts, the social sciences, and the sciences. He also is a columnist for The Australian newspaper’s weekly Higher Education Supplement. Between 1994 and 2008, he was the editor for 10 years of Earshot Jazz, a Seattle monthly magazine, and continues to write for that publication. He, too, programmed for several years at KBCS – harsh, abrasive, anti-social music, according to the management; experimental jazz, to the listeners. Australian-born, he has lived in Seattle since 1986. The first movie he ever saw, in 1964, was about the Maori wars of New Zealand – it was so scary he had to go and buy some Minties. It may well have been Hei Tiki: A Maori Legend (1935, by American Alexander Markey; also known as Primitive Passions), where a thousand warriors lock in pitched battle, and we witness the race between the mighty war canoes and the volcanic eruption that foretells the coming of the War God, all little relieved by the the romance of Manui and Mara. Just as upsetting was the main feature, Son of Robin Hood (1959), in which the son is actually a daughter and someone got tortured in a dungeon.

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Caylin Smith

Caylin Smith, MIAN contributing writer, completed her bachelor’s degree in English (Cultural Studies) at McGill University, and is pursuing a master’s degree in moving image archival studies at the University of Amsterdam.