Archive • August 2016

Restoring the One-Eyed with Blinkers On: The Curious Case of Marlon Brando’s Muddled Apprenticepiece

posted August 24, 2016

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"One-Eyed Jacks" was the only film Marlon Brando directed, and he made it, in 1961, only because he and a young Stanley Kubrick, its intended director, had so many “creative differences” that Brando decided he would take on the job, himself. Now the film has been lavishly restored, and its oddness can be gauged anew.

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Categories: FeaturesOf Special Interest

Nitrate Film to Light Up the Egyptian Again

posted August 17, 2016

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In the early years of motion pictures, movies were conveyed on nitrate film stock. That medium had a major shortcoming: it could burst into flame during projection. The Egyptian Theater in Hollywood is undergoing renovations that will make it possible for the facility to screen nitrate film regularly for the first time since the early 1950s.

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Categories: FeaturesNewsOf Special Interest

“Race Films” – Little-Known Screen Gems

posted August 12, 2016

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“Race films” were made with African American actors and crews, and for the most part by African American directors and producers; they were popular with African American audiences from the 1920s to the 1940s, but are little known, now. That may change through the efforts of several moving-image archives and the distributor Kino Lorber.

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Categories: FeaturesOf Special Interest

The Mysterious Videos of Bill Domonkos

posted August 8, 2016

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Bill Domonkos is taking stock-footage filmmaking in an entirely different direction, moving into the dream world of the unconscious, writes Wheeler Winston Dixon. Using Public Domain found materials, almost exclusively in black and white, mostly from the Internet Archive and The Prelinger Collection, Domonkos creates a dream world of phantasmal and sometimes sinister images that transport the viewer to an entirely different place and time, when black and white was the dominant form of filmmaking, and the repressive values of the 1940s and 1950s went unquestioned.

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Categories: FeaturesOf Special Interest